Amanda Hopper Writes

A writer's tale of living and working in the country.

Pioneerification: Laundry Detergent

Everyone here at the Funny Farm has undergone a significant change since we moved out where the longhorns roam.
Pioneerification.
When the kids are cold in the winter, they don’t walk over to the thermostat. They run out to the woodpile, bring 3 logs of hardwood and 1 softwood piece up the stairs to the fireplace. They ask yours truly to light a fire, offering handfuls of recycled newspaper and matches. 
Living out in the boonies has turned us green. We all have a much better understanding of the importance of rain, the miracle of life, and the value of creativity and hard work.
We have a garden. We save our vegetable scraps for stock. We conserve our water, recycle, and reuse. We find ways to make our own cleaners so as not to damage our best friend… Mr. Septic System.
The desire to prevent any kind of bonding experience with the septic has led to homemade laundry detergent. Not only do we have to protect what goes out of our pipes, we have extremely hard water. The tricks I have learned in my battle against hard water stains could fill a small book.
So for those of you who suffer as we do, I am sharing the laundry detergent recipe that works best for us.

Funny Farm Homemade Laundry Soap
1 bar Fels Naptha (grated)
1 cup Borax
1 cup Washing Soda

Combine the ingredients in a glass jar with a lid. Shake well. Use 1 Tablespoon for small to medium loads and 2 Tablespoons for large loads. 
All of the ingredients can be found in the laundry aisle at Walmart. 

**When grating the Fels Naptha bar in the kitchen, be sure to tell the kid grabbing a handful that it is NOT grated cheese before he sticks it in his mouth.
Or don’t:)

“The cheese tastes funny? I have no idea why.”

2 Comments

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  2. Oh, I remember Fels Naptha. My dad used it for handsoap. Tell your kid not to feel bad – it really does look like cheese!

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